Boston Common Christmas Tree

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The Boston Common Christmas tree is an annual gift from the people of Nova Scotia, Canada, to the city of Boston, Massachusetts. This tradition dates back to 1917 and is a symbol of gratitude and solidarity between the two regions.

Have you ever seen the Boston Common Christmas tree in person? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think of it!

History:

The tree is a token of appreciation for the assistance and support Boston provided to Halifax, Nova Scotia, during a devastating event known as the Halifax Explosion.

The Halifax Explosion occurred on December 6, 1917, when two ships, one carrying explosives, collided in the Halifax Harbor. The explosion resulted in widespread destruction, causing thousands of casualties and leaving many residents homeless.

Boston quickly responded to the disaster by sending aid and emergency personnel, and this act of generosity has fostered a strong bond between the two cities ever since.

The tradition of sending a Christmas tree from Nova Scotia to Boston began in 1971 as a way to express gratitude for the assistance provided over 50 years earlier. Each year, Nova Scotia selects a tree, usually a large and beautiful spruce or fir, to be sent to Boston as a gift.

The tree is typically harvested in a public ceremony and then transported to Boston Common, one of the oldest public parks in America, where it becomes the centerpiece of Boston’s annual holiday decorations.

Boston Common Tree Lighting:

The Boston Common tree Lighting marks the official start of the holiday season in Boston. The lighting of the tree is a significant event, drawing locals and visitors alike.

The tree is adorned with thousands of lights and decorations, and its lighting ceremony is often attended by officials from both Nova Scotia and Boston, symbolizing the enduring friendship between the two regions.

Attendees are treated to seasonal music, hot cocoa, and other holiday treats. The lighting ceremony is a family-friendly event that brings together the community to celebrate the holiday season.

The tree lighting ceremony is often followed by a fireworks display, adding an extra element of excitement to the festivities.

The Boston Common Tree Lighting has become a cherished tradition that attracts locals and visitors alike. It symbolizes the spirit of community, generosity, and the joy of the holiday season.

The Boston Common Christmas tree has become a beloved symbol of goodwill, friendship, and the holiday spirit, commemorating the historical ties between Nova Scotia and Boston while spreading joy during the festive season.

If you want to see more Christmas trees in Massachusetts, check out this article on lobster trap Christmas trees in Massachusetts.

Sources:
Bilis, Madeline. “The Boston Common Christmas Tree, By the Numbers.” Boston Magazine, 1 Dec. 2016, bostonmagazine.com/arts-entertainment/2016/12/01/boston-common-christmas-tree-numbers/
Scheller, Bill. “How Boston Got Its Christmas Tree.” NewEngland.com, 17 Oct. 2017, newengland.com/travel/massachusetts/how-boston-got-its-christmas-tree/
“Tree for Boston.” Nova Scotia, novascotia.ca/treeforboston/
“Boston Common Tree Lighting.” Boston.gov, boston.gov/calendar/boston-common-tree-lighting

About William Briscoe

William Briscoe is a seasoned travel blogger and adventurer based in Massachusetts. With a passion for exploring hidden gems and sharing his travel experiences, Briscoe's website, "Mass Attractions," has become a go-to resource for those seeking seasonal attractions in Massachusetts. In addition to his website, William has contributed travel stories and articles to various travel publications, and his work has been featured in several magazines and online platforms. He also collaborates with tourism boards and travel companies to promote sustainable and responsible travel practices. William enjoys exploring the scenic beauty of New England, spending time with his family and two rescue dogs, and experimenting with classical New England recipes in his kitchen. He holds a degree in English Literature from Boston University, which he believes laid the foundation for his writing skills.

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